Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology hostReport as inadecuate


Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host


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Publication Date: 2015-03-08

Journal Title: The Plant Journal

Publisher: Wiley

Volume: 82

Issue: 3

Pages: 532-546

Language: English

Type: Article

Metadata: Show full item record

Citation: Scaife, M. A., Nguyen, G. T., Rico, J., Lambert, D., Helliwell, K. E., & Smith, A. G. (2015). Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host. The Plant Journal, 82 (3), 532-546.

Description: This paper was originally published in The Plant Journal (Scaife MA, Nguyen GTDT, Rico J, Lambert D, Helliwell KE, Smith AG, The Plant Journal 2015, doi:10.1111/tpj.12781).

Abstract: Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach.

Keywords: synthetic biology, industrial biotechnology, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, metabolic engineering, rational design, transgene expression

Sponsorship: M.A.S and J.R were funded by the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) grant BB/I00680X/1, M.A.S was also funded by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme (FP7) project SPLASH (Sustainable PoLymers from Algae Sugars and Hydrocarbons), grant agreement number 311956. G.T.D.T.N was funded in part by Murray Edwards College and the Cambridge Philosophical Society. D.L. was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and K.E.H was funded by BBSRC grant BB/I013164/1.

Identifiers:

This record's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tpj.12781http://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/247271

Rights: Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales

Licence URL: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/





Author: Scaife, Mark A.Nguyen, Ginnie T.D.T.Rico, JuanLambert, DevinnHelliwell, Katherine E.Smith, Alison G.

Source: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/247271



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