Ortíz Pérez, María José - Capítulo 2. Literature Revie- A corpus based study of the evolution of be like as a quotative to report either direct speech or internal thougReport as inadecuate




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Ortíz Pérez, María José
- Capítulo 2. Literature
Revie-
A corpus based study of the evolution of be like as a
quotative to report either direct speech or internal
thought in American English
-- Licenciatura en Idiomas. - Departamento de
Lenguas. - Escuela de Artes y
Humanidades, - Universidad de las Américas
Puebl


Teaser



A corpus based study of be like to report direct speech or internal thought 5 2.
Literature review 2.1.
Quotatives Quotatives are markers used to start a quotation or quote, which are utterances repeated word for word and attributed to another speaker.
They are used for dramatic effect (Blyth, Recktenwald, & Wang, 1990) and to introduce gestures, nonlexicalized sounds, and reported speech (either direct speech or inner monologue).
While the verb to say was the prototypal traditional quotative in the English language (Wikström, 2014, p.
83), in the last decades several quotatives have appeared in English and other languages.
Speakers who use a quotative also express what the probability of the quote having been actually uttered is.
This means that certain quotatives express certain degrees of hypotheticality (i.e.
the probability of the realization of a state of affairs, event, or action). Regarding the categorization of quotatives, there has been a number of proposals to classify the various quotatives in the English language.
For example, a number of authors use chronological criteria to talk about ‘innovative’ and ‘new’quotatives (Blyth, Recktenwald, & Wang, 1990; Romaine and Lange, 1991; Ferrara and Bell, 1995, as cited by Tagliamonte, & Hudson, 1999).
A much clearer distinction can be made observing their structure.
Following this idea, Buchstaller (2015, p.
462) proposes a characterization of quotatives with straightforward examples, making a clear distinction between old forms (to say, to think, and to decide) and new forms (be like, kind of, and zero): (1) Old forms: NOUN PHRASE + TRANSITIVE VERB OF REPORTING + QUOTE a) If you touched a one they would say “wey you’re on” b) And I thought “Well we need some more popcorn”. c) And then I decided “oh I want to do art after all” A corpus based study of be like to report direct speech or internal thought 6 (2) New forms: NOUN PHRASE + COPULA + (DISCOURSE MARKER) + QUOTE a) She’s like ...






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