Ortíz Pérez, María José - Capítulo 1. Introductio- A corpus based study of the evolution of be like as a quotative to report either direct speech or internal thought in Report as inadecuate




Ortíz Pérez, María José - Capítulo 1. Introductio- A corpus based study of the evolution of be like as a quotative to report either direct speech or internal thought in - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.


Ortíz Pérez, María José
- Capítulo 1. Introductio-
A corpus based study of the evolution of be like as a
quotative to report either direct speech or internal
thought in American English
-- Licenciatura en Idiomas. - Departamento de
Lenguas. - Escuela de Artes y
Humanidades, - Universidad de las Américas
Puebla.


Teaser



A corpus based study of be like to report direct speech or internal thought 1 1.
Introduction In an interview in 2011 with Jimmy Fallon by CNN’S Piers Morgan, the following exchange was recorded: MORGAN: How important to your well-being is the love of a good woman? Your wife? FALLON: I’d be nothing without my wife.
She’s the coolest.
She’s the greatest.
She is the smartest.
She’s the funniest.
I love her so much.
She’s like (1) the – it’s like (2) your best friend for the rest of your life.
You can call her up and be like (3) this happened to me.
Or what do you think of this and she goes*, oh.
And she gives you good advice, you know.
Or you go like*, want to see a movie? And like (4), yes.
Which one? Like (5) I want to see this one.
And she’s like (6); I don’t want to see that one.
It’s like (7), come on, it’s like (8), all right, I’ll do it.
She’ll do it.
It’s like (9) those kinds of things, and you’re like (10) I want to go to this restaurant.
And she’s like (11), I don’t really care about restaurants.
And you’re like (12) but I love restaurants.
All right, let’s do it, you know. In one long response, the word like appeared 13 times, and in none of them (except maybe #1) was used to describe something. In #2, #7, #8, and #9, we have examples of it’s like-enactment, which “are used to enact thoughts, feelings and attitudes which are internal and affect-laden assessments of a prior utterance or event, produced as assessments that anyone in the same situation might have had” (Fox & Robles, 2010, p.
715).
The purpose of this function is to represent the entire situation or event so the listener may feel involved in the scene and have a reaction. In #2, the narrator compares his wonderful wife with a best friend forever so the listener can understand how wonderful she is even if the listener is not married.
In #7 and #8, Fallon uses common phrases to resume whatever short exchange he had with his wife to convince her to ...






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