Teague, Brad Landon - Capítulo 3. Data Collection and Analysi- A Comparative Study of Attitudes toward Literacy: Parents, Students, and Teachers in a Mexican Elementary SchReport as inadecuate




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Teague, Brad Landon
- Capítulo 3. Data
Collection and Analysi-
A Comparative Study of Attitudes toward Literacy:
Parents, Students, and Teachers in a Mexican Elementary
School
-- Maestría en
Lingüística Aplicada. - Departamento de Lenguas. - Escuela de Artes y Humanidades, - Universidad de las
Américas Puebla.


Teaser



CHAPTER 3: DATA COLL ECTION AND ANALYSIS 3.1. Data collection 3.1.1.
Observations Observations are essential in qualitative studies because they allow the researcher to witness certain patterns of behavior.
Although one might argue that any desired information could be obtained solely through interviews, it is important to note that individuals are often unaware of their own conduct, especially of practices and routines to which they have become accustomed over time.
Literacy classrooms are no exception. Both students and teachers possess unconscious attitudes and beliefs toward learning and teaching to read and write, which inexorably govern their actions in the classroom. Accordingly, the first motivation behind the choice of using observations in this particular study was that these sessions permitted the researcher to identify characteristics of the classroom relevant to literacy instruction, such as the quality and quantity of student involvement, materials, and teaching styles and preferences.
The second reason observations were conducted was so that the teachers and students could become somewhat familiar with the presence of the researcher prior to the onset of more personalized data collection procedures, namely participant observations and interviews. In this way, it was assumed that the participants would feel more comfortable and willing to share their ideas, work, and experiences at the time of such interactions. The observations for this study took place once a week in each of the two classrooms, with the purpose of identifying patterns of behavior toward literacy and literacy learning.
Between September and November, these observations were largely non-participative, again given that the researcher needed this time to become familiar 50 with new participants and the new context, and vice versa.
As the research developed, around December, observations became increasingly participative, and the researcher began to interact to a certain extent with ...






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