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Self-efficacy, Ecological predictors, Nested design, Academic achievement, Low-income countries, Refugee students, Academic performance of refugee students, Bio-ecological theory, Self-fulfilling prophecy, Parental involvement, Pygmalion effect, Hierarchical Linear Modeling Analysis, Teacher expectations

Khaemba, Jane N

Supervisor and department: Parrila, Rauno Educational Psychology

Examining committee member and department: Ogilvie, Linda Nursing Wilkinson, Lori Sociology Parrila, Rauno Educational Psychology McQuarrie, LynnEducational Psychology Buck, George Educational Psychology Rogers, Todd Educational Psychology

Department: Department of Educational Psychology

Specialization: Special Education

Date accepted: 2014-10-30T14:48:04Z

Graduation date: 2015-06

Degree: Doctor of Philosophy

Degree level: Doctoral

Abstract: Refugee children experience significant challenges in their schooling that can lead to poor performance and dropping out of school. To date, no study has examined what factors predict academic achievement of refugee youth in schools in low-income countries that host most of the world’s refugee students. The current study was conducted in primary Grades 7 and 8; n = 400 students, 400 parents-guardians, 80 teachers, 20 schools and secondary Forms 1 and 2; n = 400 students, 400 parents-guardians, 80 teachers, 20 schools schools in Kenya and examined individual, family, teacher, and school factors that may predict refugee students’ academic achievement. Predictor variables included measured variables student self-efficacy, parental involvement, teacher expectations, and teachers’ self-efficacy and status variables student age, gender, and grade level; parent age, gender, level of education, family type, and housing status; teacher age, gender, qualifications, and experiences; and school location. A three-level hierarchical linear model students nested within classes nested within schools was used to analyze the data for primary schools and a two-level hierarchical linear model students nested within schools was used to analyze the data for secondary schools. The results showed that student self-efficacy, parental involvement, and teacher expectations were positively associated with students’ GPA both in primary and secondary schools, and teachers’ self-efficacy predicted primary school students’ GPA. Some status variables, such as family type and grade level predicted primary school students’ GPA, and parents’ level of education predicted secondary school students’ GPA. The age of the students, parents, or teachers, as well as teachers’ gender and qualifications had no significant association with students’ GPA in the final models. Implications for practice and suggestions for future research are provided.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3QF8JS8P

Rights: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Author: Khaemba, Jane N

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


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A Hierarchical Linear Modelling Analysis of Ecological Predictors of Academic Achievement of Refugee Students in Kenya by Jane Namubuya Khaemba A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Special Education Department of Educational Psychology University of Alberta © Jane Namubuya Khaemba, 2014 ii Abstract Refugee children experience significant challenges in their schooling that can lead to poor performance and dropping out of school.
To date, no study has examined what factors predict academic achievement of refugee youth in schools in low-income countries that host most of the world’s refugee students.
The current study was conducted in primary (Grades 7 and 8; n = 400 students, 400 parents-guardians, 80 teachers, 20 schools) and secondary (Forms 1 and 2; n = 400 students, 400 parents-guardians, 80 teachers, 20 schools) schools in Kenya and examined individual, family, teacher, and school factors that may predict refugee students’ academic achievement.
Predictor variables included measured variables (student self-efficacy, parental involvement, teacher expectations, and teachers’ self-efficacy) and status variables (student age, gender, and grade level; parent age, gender, level of education, family type, and housing status; teacher age, gender, qualifications, and experiences; and school location).
A three-level hierarchical linear model (students nested within classes nested within schools) was used to analyze the data for primary schools and a two-level hierarchical linear model (students nested within schools) was used to analyze the data for secondary schools.
The results showed that student self-efficacy, parental involvement, and teacher expectations were positively associated with students’ GPA both in primary and secondary schools, and teachers’ self-efficacy predicted primary school students’ GPA.
Some status variables, such as family type and grade level predicted primary sc...





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