Parental regret regarding children’s vaccines—The correlation between anticipated regret, altruism, coping strategies and attitudes toward vaccinesReport as inadecuate




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Israel Journal of Health Policy Research

, 5:55

First Online: 07 November 2016Received: 15 June 2016Accepted: 27 October 2016DOI: 10.1186-s13584-016-0116-1

Cite this article as: Hamama-Raz, Y., Ginossar-David, E. & Ben-Ezra, M. Isr J Health Policy Res 2016 5: 55. doi:10.1186-s13584-016-0116-1

Abstract

BackgroundParental hesitancy for recommended childhood vaccines is a growing public health concern influenced by various factors. This study aimed to explore regret regarding parental decisions to vaccinate their children via possible correlations between anticipated regret, altruism, coping strategies, and parents’ attitudes toward the vaccination of their children.

MethodsThe study was conducted during 2014 in Israel. Data were collected via snowballing methodology i.e., Internet forums, Facebook and e- mails. 314 parents of children ages 0–6 years participated in the study. Questionnaires were distributed and completed on-line including attitudes toward vaccines, altruism, coping strategies, regret and anticipated regret.

ResultsPearson analysis revealed a moderate negative association between attitudes toward vaccinations and regret. In addition, weak but significant positive associations emerged between anticipated regret and regret as well as between gender and regret.

Performing hierarchical regression analysis revealed contribution of 35.9 % to the explained variance of regret suggesting that coping strategy of instrumental support, attitudes toward vaccinations and anticipated regret are linked significantly to regret.

ConclusionParental attitudes toward vaccines and anticipated regret have a salient role when deciding whether or not to vaccinate children and contribute to the prediction of regret regarding vaccination. In order to increase parental consent to vaccination of their children, it is important to minimize possible regret through the strength of the recommendation and-or knowledge base about risk-benefit perceived, heuristic of vaccines that might influence parental attitudes and lessen their anticipated regret.

Trial registrationN-A. This is not a clinical trial and thus does not require registration. Ethics approval was received from Ariel University School of Social Work Ethics committee 18-02-14. This was an attitude survey.

The Ariel University School of Social Work Ethics committee approved performance of this attitude survey 18-02-14.

KeywordsAttitudes toward vaccines Altruism Coping strategies Regret Anticipated regret AbbreviationsDRSDecision Regret Scale

HBMHealth Belief Model

IPInternet protocol address

OPVOral polio vaccine

PCVPneumococcus bacteria

SDStandard deviation

WHOWorld Health Organization

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Author: Yaira Hamama-Raz - Eyal Ginossar-David - Menachem Ben-Ezra

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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