Are first-order disparity gradients spatial primitives of the orientation of lines on the ground plane? Report as inadecuate




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J. Antonio Aznar-Casanova ; Nelson Torro-Alves ; Hans Supèr ;Psychology & Neuroscience 2014, 7 3

Author: Laura Pérez Zapata

Source: http://www.redalyc.org/


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Psychology & Neuroscience ISSN: 1984-3054 landeira@puc-rio.br Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro Brasil Pérez Zapata, Laura; Aznar-Casanova, J.
Antonio; Torro-Alves, Nelson; Supèr, Hans Are first-order disparity gradients spatial primitives of the orientation of lines on the ground plane? Psychology & Neuroscience, vol.
7, núm.
3, 2014, pp.
285-299 Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Available in: http:--www.redalyc.org-articulo.oa?id=207032650007 How to cite Complete issue More information about this article Journals homepage in redalyc.org Scientific Information System Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal Non-profit academic project, developed under the open access initiative Psychology & Neuroscience, 2014, 7, 3, 285 - 299 DOI: 10.3922-j.psns.2014.039 Are first-order disparity gradients spatial primitives of the orientation of lines on the ground plane? Laura Pérez Zapata1, J.
Antonio Aznar-Casanova1, Nelson Torro-Alves2, and Hans Supèr1,3 1- University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 2- Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil 3- Catalan Institution in Advanced Research, Barcelona, Spain Abstract The present study investigated the mechanisms involved in processing orientation on the frontal and ground planes.
The stimuli comprised two yellow circles conceived as the endpoints of a segment and depicted on a black background.
In Experiment 1, the observers performed two tasks on both planes (frontal and ground).
In Task 1 they were asked to indicate the absolute location of the two endpoints, presented one at a time (successive task).
In Task 2 they had to locate the relative position of the endpoints presented simultaneously (simultaneous task).
Relative and absolute errors were analyzed according to a cyclopean coordinate system derived from the geometry of the visual scene.
These two kinds of errors were studied within the fr...





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