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Corpora linguistics, English language - Verb, English language - Aspect

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Subject-Keyword: Corpora linguistics English language - Verb English language - Aspect

Type of item: Journal Article Published

Language: English

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Description: We explore the usage of the cardinal English posture verbs sit, stand, and lie relying on a number of corpora of English with a view towards establishing quantitative and qualitative differences for these search items across relatively small and relatively large corpora. Frequencies of these verbs in various contexts were compared, as well as the range of correlates found in some selected constructions. Our results reveal a high degree of consistency between all the corpora for frequency of occurrence of the posture verbs. However, only the very large corpus revealed the full extent of collocational patterning exhibited by these verbs, which for most linguists is the primary reason for engaging in corpus-based investigation.

Date created: 2001

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3MC8RK1G

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Rights: © 2001 John Newman and Sally Rice. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original authors and source must be cited.





Author: Newman, John Rice, Sally

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


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English SIT, STAND, and LIE in small and large corpora John Newman Massey University Sally Rice University of Alberta Abstract We explore the usage of the cardinal English posture verbs sit, stand, and lie relying on a number of corpora of English with a view towards establishing quantitative and qualitative differences for these search items across relatively small and relatively large corpora.
Frequencies of these verbs in various contexts were compared, as well as the range of correlates found in some selected constructions.
Our results reveal a high degree of consistency between all the corpora for frequency of occurrence of the posture verbs.
However, only the very large corpus revealed the full extent of collocational patterning exhibited by these verbs, which for most linguists is the primary reason for engaging in corpus-based investigation. 1 Introduction The general context of the present study is a larger project which examines the syntagmatic behavior and pragmatics of posture verbs in English and other languages (Newman in press a, and the papers contained therein; especially Newman in press b; Newman and Rice 2001).
The overall project is concerned in particular with the grammaticalization of ‘sit’, ‘stand’, and ‘lie’ verbs as tense and aspect markers and noun classifiers.
English sit, stand, and lie have not undergone grammaticalizations of this sort.
Nevertheless, we believe that patterns of collocation with these verbs in English reveal patterns which in some ways mirror the patterns of grammaticalization evident in some other languages (cf Heine et al 1991; Heine et al 1993; Kuteva 1999).
Obviously, introspection and casual observation are of limited value in what they can and cannot yield in terms of insights into linguistic patterning over multiple lemma sets in multiple 109 ICAME Journal No.
25 contexts.
Therefore, we have conducted searches for these verbs and their constructional and usage contexts in a variety of spoken and w...





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