The effect of an online video intervention ‘Movie Models’ on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to children’s physical activity, screen-time and healthy diet: a quasi experimental studyReport as inadecuate




The effect of an online video intervention ‘Movie Models’ on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to children’s physical activity, screen-time and healthy diet: a quasi experimental study - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

BMC Public Health

, 17:366

Energy balance-related behaviors

Abstract

BackgroundIn children, being sufficiently physically active, having low levels of screen-time and having a healthy diet are largely influenced by parenting practices. Children of parents applying positive parenting practices are at lower risk for overweight and obesity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of a health promoting online video intervention for parents ‘Movie Models’ on children’s physical activity PA, screen-time and healthy diet, and on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to these parenting practices. The online videos are delivered to parents of primary schoolchildren, and were based on real-life scenarios.

MethodsA two-armed, quasi experimental design was used. Parents of primary schoolchildren were recruited between November and December 2013 by spreading an appeal in social media, and by contacting primary schools. Participating parents were predominantly of high socio-economic status SES 83.1%, and only 6.8% of children were overweight-obese. Intervention group participants were invited to watch online videos for 4 weeks. Specific parenting practices, parental self-efficacy, PA, screen-time and healthy diet of the child were assessed at baseline T0, at one T1 and at four T2 months post baseline. Repeated Measures Multivariate ANOVAs were used to examine intervention effects. The potential moderating effect of age and gender of the child and parental SES was also examined.

ResultsBetween T0 and T2, no significant intervention effects were found on children’s PA, screen-time or healthy diet. Most significant intervention effects were found for more complex parenting practices e.g., an increase in motivating the child to eat fruit. Subgroup analyses showed that the intervention had more effect on the actual parenting practices related to PA, screen-time and healthy diet in parents of older children 10–12 years old, whereas intervention effects on parental self-efficacy related to those behaviors were stronger in parents of younger children 6–9 years old.

Conclusions‘Movie Models’ was effective in increasing some important parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to PA, screen-time and healthy diet in children. Therefore, the current study is an important first step in promoting effective parenting-related factors, and possibly increasing children’s healthy diet and PA, and decreasing screen-time.

Trial registrationNCT02278809 in ClinicalTrials.gov on October 28, 2014 retrospectively registered.

KeywordsParenting Parenting practices Parental self-efficacy Parent Child Physical activity Screen-time Healthy diet AbbreviationsANOVAAnalysis of variance

BMIBody mass index

PAPhysical activity

SESSocio-economic status

T0Baseline

T1One month post baseline

T2Four months post baseline

Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-s12889-017-4264-1 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.





Author: Sara De Lepeleere - Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij - Greet Cardon - Maïté Verloigne

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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