SPH Simulation of Acoustic Waves: Effects of Frequency, Sound Pressure, and Particle SpacingReport as inadecuate




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Mathematical Problems in Engineering - Volume 2015 2015, Article ID 348314, 7 pages -

Research Article

School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA

Hubei Key Laboratory of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering Hydrodynamics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China

School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, The Quadrangle, L69 3GH Liverpool, UK

Received 30 August 2014; Revised 15 November 2014; Accepted 15 November 2014

Academic Editor: Kim M. Liew

Copyright © 2015 Y. O. Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Acoustic problems consisting of multiphase systems or with deformable boundaries are difficult to describe using mesh-based methods, while the meshfree, Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics SPH method can handle such complicated problems. In this paper, after solving linearized acoustic equations with the standard SPH theory, the feasibility of the SPH method in simulating sound propagation in the time domain is validated. The effects of sound frequency, maximum sound pressure amplitude, and particle spacing on numerical error and time cost are then subsequently discussed based on the sound propagation simulation. The discussion based on a limited range of frequency and sound pressure demonstrates that the rising of sound frequency increases simulation error, and the increase is nonlinear, whereas the rising sound pressure has limited effects on the error. In addition, decreasing the particle spacing reduces the numerical error, while simultaneously increasing the CPU time. The trend of both changes is close to linear on a logarithmic scale.





Author: Y. O. Zhang, T. Zhang, H. Ouyang, and T. Y. Li

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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