Effects of Forest Harvesting on Nest Predation in Cavity-Nesting WaterfowlReport as inadecuate




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rates, edges, artificial nests, mammals, landscape

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Subject-Keyword: rates edges artificial nests mammals landscape

Type of item: Journal Article Published

Language: English

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Date created: 2001

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3DB7VS67

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Rights: This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original authors and source must be cited.





Author: Pierre, J.P. Bears, H. Paszkowski, C.A.

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


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Charles Lathrop Pack Forestry Foundation,Washington,D.C. Received 15 November 1999, accepted 5 September2000. Associate Editor: J.
Walters The Auk 118(1):224-230, 2001 Effects of ForestHarvesting on Nest Predation in Cavity-nesting Waterfowl JOHANNA P.
PIERRE,1HEATHER BEARS, AND CYNTHIA A.
PASZKOWSKI Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada Waterfowl populations in North America are threatened by habitat loss (Owen and Black 1990), but effects of habitat destruction and fragmentation on waterfowl nesting in forested landscapes are poorly known.
Increased nest predation is often attributed to habitat fragmentation and may be particularly evident in smaller habitat patches and at habitat edges (Paton 1994, Andren 1995).
However, relatively few studies conducted in forest-dominated landscapes show edge effects at either natural or anthropogenic edges (Paton 1994, Andren 1995, Poysa et al.
1997).
Lack of edge effects in forest-dominated landscapes may be due to relatively low predator species richness and abundance, and lack of predator attraction to edges (Andren 1995).
However, predator abundance and nest predation may increase with increased deforestation of the landscape (Andren 1995, Hartley and Hunter 1998). Effects of habitat destruction and fragmentation on nest pre...





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