Identification of multiple genetically distinct populations of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in a small coastal watershedReport as inadecuate




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Environmental Biology of Fishes

pp 1–11

First Online: 20 May 2017Received: 12 September 2016Accepted: 24 April 2017DOI: 10.1007-s10641-017-0616-z

Cite this article as: Davis, C.D., Garza, J.C. & Banks, M.A. Environ Biol Fish 2017. doi:10.1007-s10641-017-0616-z

Abstract

Management and restoration planning for Pacific salmon is often characterized by efforts at broad multi-basin scales. However, finer-scale genetic and phenotypic variability may be present within individual basins and can be overlooked in such efforts, even though it may be a critical component for long-term viability. Here, we investigate Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha within the Siletz River, a small coastal watershed in Oregon, USA. Adult Chinook salmon were genotyped using neutral microsatellite markers, single nucleotide polymorphisms and -adaptive- loci, associated with temporal variation in migratory behavior in many salmon populations, to investigate genetic diversity based upon both spatial and temporal variation in migratory and reproductive behavior. Results from all three marker types identified two genetically distinct populations in the basin, corresponding to early returning fish that spawn above a waterfall, a spring-run population, and later returning fish spawning below the waterfall, a fall-run population. This finding is an important consideration for management of the species, as spring-run populations generally only have been recognized in large watersheds, and highlights the need to evaluate population structure of salmon within smaller watersheds, and thereby increase the probability of successful conservation of salmon species.

KeywordsPopulation genetics Conservation Coastal watershed Chinook salmon Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1007-s10641-017-0616-z contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.





Author: Chante D. Davis - John Carlos Garza - Michael A. Banks

Source: https://link.springer.com/







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