Results of a Feasibility and Acceptability Trial of an Online Smoking Cessation Program Targeting Young Adult Nondaily SmokersReport as inadecuate




Results of a Feasibility and Acceptability Trial of an Online Smoking Cessation Program Targeting Young Adult Nondaily Smokers - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Journal Title:

Journal of Environmental and Public Health

Volume:

Volume 2012, Number 2012

Publisher:

Hindawi Publishing Corporation | 2012-02-07, Pages 1-8

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract: Despite increases in nondaily smoking among young adults, no prior research has aimed to develop and test an intervention targeting this group. Thus, we aimed to develop and test the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of an online intervention targeting college student nondaily smokers. We conducted a one-arm feasibility and acceptability trial of a four-week online intervention with weekly contacts among 31 college student nondaily smokers. We conducted assessments at baseline B, end of treatment EOT, and six-week followup FU. We maintained a 100% retention rate over the 10-week period. Google Analytics data indicated positive utilization results, and 71.0% were satisfied with the program. There were increases P < .001 in the number of people refraining from smoking for the past 30 days and reducing their smoking from B to EOT and to FU, with additional individuals reporting being quit despite recent smoking. Participants also increased in their perceptions of how bothersome secondhand smoke is to others P<0.05; however, no other attitudinal variables were altered. Thus, this intervention demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness among college-aged nondaily smokers. Additional research is needed to understand how nondaily smokers define cessation, improve measures for cessation, and examine theoretical constructs related to smoking among this population.

Subjects: Health Sciences, Public Health - Environmental Sciences - Research Funding: This research was supported by the National Cancer Institute 1K07CA139114-01A1; PI: Berg and the Georgia Cancer Coalition PI: Berg.





Author: Carla Berg, Gillian Schauer,

Source: https://open.library.emory.edu/



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