The new Canadian children and youth study. Research to Fill a Gap in Canada’s Children’s Agenda.Report as inadecuate




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longitudinal studies, children, Canada, youth

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Subject-Keyword: longitudinal studies children Canada youth

Type of item: Journal Article Published

Language: English

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Description: One in every five children living in Canada was either born somewhere else or born into immigrant and refugee families, and Canada expects a lot from them. The literature about immigrant and refugee children is riddled with paradoxes, inconsistent results and unanswered questions. Longitudinal research, employing sufficiently large samples of children in differing situations, living in different regions of the country, and using culturally and situation-sensitive measures is badly needed. The NCCYS is one attempt to address this need.

Date created: 2005

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3D795C1W

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Rights: © 2005 Association for Canadian Studies. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original authors and source must be cited.





Author: Beiser, M. Armstrong, R. Ogilvie, L. Oxman-Martinez, J. Rummens, A.

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


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THE NEW CANADIAN CHILDREN AND YOUTH STUDY Research to Fill a Gap in Canada’s Children’s Agenda ABSTRACT One in every five children living in Canada was either born somewhere else or born into immigrant and refugee families, and Canada expects a lot from them.
The literature about immigrant and refugee children is riddled with paradoxes, inconsistent results and unanswered questions.
Longitudinal research, employing sufficiently large samples of children in differing situations, living in different regions of the country, and using culturally and situation-sensitive measures is badly needed.
The NCCYS is one attempt to address this need. R University of British Columbia ROBERT ARMSTRONG University of Toronto MORTON BEISER Université de Montréal JACQUELINE OXMAN-MARTINEZ University of Alberta LINDA OGILVIE arely has so much return been expected from so little investment.
One in every five children living in Canada was either born somewhere else or born into immigrant and refugee families, and Canada expects a lot from them.
On the one hand, we expect their achievements to help justify our relatively large immigration rates.
On the other hand, we act as if this will happen even though we choose to largely ignore their health, development, and adaptation.
Take, for example, Statistics Canada’s National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth (NLSCY).
On a simple probability basis, the NLSCY sample of more than 23,000 should include about 4,600 immigrant and refugee children.
However, a single study – not even one of the scope and quality of the NLSCY – can accomplish everything.
For various reasons, immigrant and refugee households were undersampled: instead of the expected number, the NLSCY sample contains only 358 immigrant and refugee children. Health Research to enrich theory, to enlighten policy, and to direct practice JOANNA ANNEKE RUMMENS University of Toronto The NLSCY is only one of several national health studies to neglect immigrant...





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