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Case Reports in Otolaryngology - Volume 2015 2015, Article ID 121028, 4 pages -

Case Report

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gold Coast University Hospital, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia

Department of Neurosurgery, Gold Coast University Hospital, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia

Department of Medical Imaging, Gold Coast University Hospital, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia

Received 15 December 2014; Revised 18 January 2015; Accepted 15 February 2015

Academic Editor: Holger Sudhoff

Copyright © 2015 Pasan Waidyasekara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Intracranial extension of cholesteatoma is rare. This may occur de novo or recur some time later either contiguous with or separate to the site of the original cholesteatoma. Presentation of Case. A 63-year-old female presented to a tertiary referral hospital with a fluctuating level of consciousness, fever, headache, and right-sided otorrhoea, progressing over several days. Her past medical history included surgery for right ear cholesteatoma and drainage of intracranial abscess 23 years priorly. There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma. The patient underwent a combined transmastoid-middle fossa approach for removal of the cholesteatoma and repair of the tegmen dehiscence. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remains well over 12 months later. Conclusion. This case presentation details a large intracranial cholesteatoma which had extended through a tegmen tympani dehiscence from recurrent right ear cholesteatoma treated by modified radical mastoidectomy over two decades priorly. There was a completely asymptomatic progression of disease until several weeks prior to this presentation.





Author: Pasan Waidyasekara, Samuel A. Dowthwaite, Ellison Stephenson, Sandeep Bhuta, and Brent McMonagle

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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