A Survey of Seasonal Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections in Donkeys from a Semiarid Sub-Saharan Region, SudanReport as inadecuate




A Survey of Seasonal Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections in Donkeys from a Semiarid Sub-Saharan Region, Sudan - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Journal of Pathogens - Volume 2016 2016, Article ID 4602751, 8 pages -

Research Article

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Nyala, P.O. Box 155, Nyala, Sudan

Directorate of Animal Health, State Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources, P.O. Box 155, Nyala, South Darfur, Sudan

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Nyala, P.O. Box 155, Nyala, Sudan

College of Veterinary Medicine, Sudan University of Science and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan

Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Qassim University, P.O. Box 6622, Buraidah 51452, Saudi Arabia

Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Gezira, P.O. Box 20, Wadmedani, Sudan

Received 1 November 2015; Accepted 3 March 2016

Academic Editor: Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios

Copyright © 2016 Ahmed Abdurhman Ismail et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Out of 92 donkeys examined for gastrointestinal parasites, 90 animals were found infected by one or more gastrointestinal parasites with an overall prevalence rate of 97.78%. The distributions of the recovered parasites in the different parts of the body were as follows: stomach, 92.4%, small intestine, 19.6%, caecum, 88%, colon, 80.4%, rectum, 73.9%, and cranial mesenteric artery, 64.1%. A significant difference was found between mean parasite counts and seasons. Hot wet season had higher mean parasites count in comparison with hot dry and cool dry seasons. Although there was no significant difference between age and mean parasite count, animals more than four years old had high mean count in comparison with and for young and adults animals, respectively. No significant positive or negative correlation was found between total parasite counts of infected animals and any of the climatic factors. The parasites identified were Habronema spp. 40.2%, Trichostrongylus axei 30.4%, Parascaris equorum 18.5%, Anoplocephala perfoliata 4.35%, Gastrodiscus aegyptiacus 8.7%, large strongyles 84%, small strongyles 72%, and Oxyuris equi 1.1%.





Author: Ahmed Abdurhman Ismail, Nasredin Khogali Ahmed, Ahmed Elhag Bashar, Hisham Ismail Seri, El Tigani Ahmed El Tigani-Asil, and A

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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