Multilocus Intron Trees Reveal Extensive Male-Biased Homogenization of Ancient Populations of Chamois Rupicapra spp. across Europe during Late PleistoceneReport as inadecuate




Multilocus Intron Trees Reveal Extensive Male-Biased Homogenization of Ancient Populations of Chamois Rupicapra spp. across Europe during Late Pleistocene - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

The inferred phylogenetic relationships between organisms often depend on the molecular marker studied due to the diverse evolutionary mode and unlike evolutionary histories of different parts of the genome. Previous studies have shown conflicting patterns of differentiation of mtDNA and several nuclear markers in chamois genus Rupicapra that indicate a complex evolutionary picture. Chamois are mountain caprine that inhabit most of the medium to high altitude mountain ranges of southern Eurasia. The most accepted taxonomical classification considers two species, R. pyrenaica with the subspecies parva, pyrenaica and ornata from southwestern Europe and R. rupicapra with the subspecies cartusiana, rupicapra, tatrica, carpatica, balcanica, asiatica and caucasica from northeastern Europe. Phylogenies of mtDNA revealed three very old clades from the early Pleistocene, 1.9 Mya with a clear geographical signal. Here we analyze a set of 23 autosomal introns, comprising 15,411 nucleotides, in 14 individuals covering the 10 chamois subspecies. Introns offered an evolutionary scenario that contrasts with mtDNA. The nucleotidic diversity was 0.0013± 0.0002, at the low range of what is found in other mammals even if a single species is considered. A coalescent multilocus analysis with *BEAST indicated that introns diversified 88 Kya, in the late Pleistocene, and the effective population size at the root was lower than 10,000 individuals. The dispersal of some few migrant males should have rapidly spread trough the populations of chamois, given the homogeneity of intron sequences. The striking differences between mitochondrial and nuclear markers can be attributed to strong female philopatry and extensive male dispersal. Our results highlight the need of analyzing multiple and varied genome components to capture the complex evolutionary history of organisms.



Author: Trinidad Pérez, Margarita Fernández, Sabine E. Hammer, Ana Domínguez

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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