Inclusive Language Usage in Feminist Bible TranslationReport as inadecuate




Inclusive Language Usage in Feminist Bible Translation - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

inclusive, bible, gender, language, translation, french, feminist, english, feminism

Rayner, Isabelle A.

Supervisor and department: Malena, Anne Modern Languages and Cultural Studies

Examining committee member and department: Penrod, Lynn Modern Languages and Cultural Studies Rao, Sathya Modern Languages and Cultural Studies

Department: Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies

Specialization: Translation Studies

Date accepted: 2015-05-14T15:06:11Z

Graduation date: 2015-11

Degree: Master of Arts

Degree level: Master's

Abstract: This thesis is based on a textual analysis of three translations of a book in the New Testament, Ephesians, to look for differences in the translators’ treatment of gender. The three versions used are the older 1984 New International Version NIV and a retranslation of the NIV that uses inclusive language; the Today’s New International Version TNIV, and a modern French Version, Segond 21. Going through each version side by side and looking word-by-word and sentence-by-sentence has resulted in research that captures most major differences between versions such as word choice and sentence restructuring. However, even the most progressive version of the three, the TNIV, has room for improvement. After careful consideration, it is possible that a new translation could be made in both languages that would be faithful to the message of the original scripture. This potential version would use more inclusive language and feminist translation techniques than any of the three versions studied in this research but it still could serve Christian audiences. This project contributes to translation history and cross-language knowledge of the Bible. It questions why French culture, whether in Québec or France, does not seem to require a more gender inclusive version of the Bible, especially since French is a gendered language.

Language: English

DOI: doi:10.7939-R3K649Z6W

Rights: Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.





Author: Rayner, Isabelle A.

Source: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/


Teaser



Inclusive Language Usage in Feminist Bible Translation by Isabelle Rayner A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Translation Studies Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies University of Alberta © Isabelle Rayner, 2015 ii Abstract This thesis is based on a textual analysis of three translations of a book in the New Testament, Ephesians, to look for differences in the translators’ treatment of gender.
The three versions used are the older 1984 New International Version (NIV) and a retranslation of the NIV that uses inclusive language; the Today’s New International Version (TNIV), and a modern French Version, Segond 21.
Going through each version side by side and looking word-by-word and sentence-by-sentence has resulted in research that captures most major differences between versions such as word choice and sentence restructuring.
However, even the most progressive version of the three, the TNIV, has room for improvement.
After careful consideration, it is possible that a new translation could be made in both languages that would be faithful to the message of the original scripture.
This potential version would use more inclusive language and feminist translation techniques than any of the three versions studied in this research but it still could serve Christian audiences.
This project contributes to translation history and crosslanguage knowledge of the Bible.
It questions why French culture, whether in Québec or France, does not seem to require a more gender inclusive version of the Bible, especially since French is a gendered language. iii Acknowledgements I would like to start with a huge thank you to my parents Debbie and Fred Rayner.
Without your continued support throughout my academic career none of this would have been possible.
Thank you for believing in me and helping in any and every way that you could. Secondly, thank you to my husband, Landon Frederick, for encouraging...





Related documents