Habitual Alcohol Consumption and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Sleep Disordered BreathingReport as inadecuate




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To investigate the associations between amount of habitual alcohol consumption HAC and prevalence of metabolic syndrome MetS, sleep, and sleep-disordered breathing SDB. We enrolled 683 untreated SDB male patients age: 54.4 ± 7.80 y, apnea-hypopnea index AHI: 29.0 ± 21.53-h. HAC was assessed as the average number of drinks consumed per week during the past 12 months. Anthropometric and biochemical markers were used to diagnose MetS. Clinical data and MetS components were compared according to the reported amounts of HAC no drinking, light drinking <13, heavy drinking ≥13 drinks-week. As reported, 78.9% of the participants n = 539 were regular drinkers; 33.7% n = 230 were habitually heavy drinkers mean: 30.7 drinks-week, and 45.2% n = 309 were light drinkers 5.1 drinks-week. The overall prevalence of MetS was 36.9% n = 252 and was most common in heavy drinkers 40.5%. Compared to non-drinkers and light drinkers, heavy drinkers had the greatest body mass index BMI and waist circumference. Central obesity, hypertension, and hyperglycemia were most prevalent in heavy drinkers. Sleep quality and severity of SDB were the worst in heavy drinkers. After adjusting for age, AHI, and BMI, heavy drinkers had a 1.71 times greater risk of MetS when compared with non-drinkers, and light and heavy drinkers had a 2.06 and 2.11 times higher risk of severe SDB than non-drinkers. HAC may increase the prevalence of MetS and deteriorate sleep in relation to amount of alcohol intake. Even light drinkers had more than twice higher risk of severe SDB than non-drinkers.



Author: Su Jung Choi , Sung Ik Lee , Eun Yeon Joo

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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