Moderate Exercise Plus Sleep Education Improves Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Daytime Mood, and Vitality in Adults with Chronic Sleep Complaints: A Waiting List-Controlled TrialReport as inadecuate




Moderate Exercise Plus Sleep Education Improves Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Daytime Mood, and Vitality in Adults with Chronic Sleep Complaints: A Waiting List-Controlled Trial - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Sleep DisordersVolume 2011 2011, Article ID 809312, 10 pages

Research Article

Institute of Sports and Sports Science, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 700, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Institute for Sport Science, University of Bern, Bremgartenstrasse 145, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

Sleep Laboratory, Central Institute of Mental Health, J5, 68159 Mannheim, Germany

Received 13 June 2011; Revised 25 August 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011

Academic Editor: Michel M. Billiard

Copyright © 2011 Carmen Gebhart et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Research indicates that physical exercise can contribute to better sleep quality. This study investigates the six-week influence of a combined intervention on self-rated sleep quality, daytime mood, and quality of life. A nonclinical sample of 114 adults with chronic initiating and the maintaining of sleep complaints participated in the study. The intervention group of 70 adults underwent moderate physical exercise, conducted weekly, plus sleep education sessions. Improvements among participants assigned to the intervention group relative to the waiting-list control group were noted for subjective sleep quality, daytime mood, depressive symptoms and vitality. Derived from PSQI subscores, the intervention group reported increased sleep duration, shortened sleep latency, fewer awakenings after sleep onset, and overall better sleep efficiency compared to controls. The attained scores were well sustained and enhanced over a time that lasted through to the follow-up 18 weeks later. These findings have implications in treatment programs concerning healthy lifestyle approaches for adults with chronic sleep complaints.





Author: Carmen Gebhart, Daniel Erlacher, and Michael Schredl

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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