The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention HeLP-Diabetes on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort StudyReport as inadecuate




The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention HeLP-Diabetes on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Journal of Diabetes ResearchVolume 2016 2016, Article ID 1476384, 13 pages

Research Article

Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK

Psychology Department, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY, UK

Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, Upper Floor 3, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK

Received 23 January 2015; Revised 9 April 2015; Accepted 29 April 2015

Academic Editor: Nitin Gupta

Copyright © 2016 Megan Hofmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention “HeLP-Diabetes” on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants’ diabetes-related distress , , and . No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes.





Author: Megan Hofmann, Charlotte Dack, Chris Barker, and Elizabeth Murray

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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