Adverse Childhood Experiences among American Indian-Alaska Native Children: The 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s HealthReport as inadecuate




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Scientifica - Volume 2016 2016, Article ID 7424239, 14 pages -

Research ArticleU.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Rockville, MD 20857, USA

Received 9 December 2015; Revised 25 May 2016; Accepted 31 May 2016

Academic Editor: Daniel Y. T. Fong

Copyright © 2016 Mary Kay Kenney and Gopal K. Singh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We examined parent-reported adverse childhood experiences ACEs and associated outcomes among American Indian and Alaska Native AI-AN children aged 0–17 years from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health. Bivariate and multivariable analyses of cross-sectional data on 1,453 AI-AN children and 61,381 non-Hispanic White NHW children assessed race-based differences in ACEs prevalence and differences in provider-diagnosed chronic emotional and developmental conditions, health characteristics, reported child behaviors, and health services received as a function of having multiple ACEs. AI-AN children were more likely to have experienced 2+ ACEs 40.3% versus 21%, 3+ ACEs 26.8% versus 11.5%, 4+ ACEs 16.8% versus 6.2%, and 5+ ACEs 9.9% versus 3.3% compared to NHW children. Prevalence rates for depression, anxiety, and ADHD were higher among AI-AN children with 3+ ACEs 14.4%, 7.7%, and 12.5% compared to AI-ANs with fewer than 2 ACEs 0.4%, 1.8%, and 5.5%. School problems, grade failures, and need for medication and counseling were 2-3 times higher among AI-ANs with 3+ ACEs versus the same comparison group. Adjusted odds ratio for emotional, developmental, and behavioral difficulties among AI-AN children with 2+ ACEs was 10.3 95% CI = 3.6–29.3. Race-based differences were largely accounted for by social and economic-related factors.





Author: Mary Kay Kenney and Gopal K. Singh

Source: https://www.hindawi.com/



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