Food justice as a response to hunger on our Canadian foodscapes: How a community-gleaning project is addressing depoliticized food insecurity through a food justice praxisReport as inadecuate




Food justice as a response to hunger on our Canadian foodscapes: How a community-gleaning project is addressing depoliticized food insecurity through a food justice praxis - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

1 UBC - University of British Columbia

Abstract : Increasingly, hunger and malnutrition are understood through the framework of food security. We argue that a series of intersecting and contemporary issues have depoliticized the concept of food security. Furthermore, the -alternative food movement-AFM-, which has grown in response to food insecurity rates, has failed to adequately address deeply embedded disparities within the food system and in instances has created new inequalities. As a result, unequal access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food, remains a largely invisible political issue. Using the example of a community-gleaning project in British Columbia, Canada, we explore how a food justice praxis helps build community capacity to influence policy around food poverty, as well as contributes to making issues of food justice more visible. We use the term praxis to reflect the merging of reflection and action, and as a tool to transform the world. We believe that when integrated through a community-based project, such as the Collaborative Harvest program in Kelowna, B.C., a food justice praxis can establish democratic, participatory, and equitable food systems in ways that a depoliticized food security framework cannot.

Keywords : Food security food poverty neoliberalism alternative food movement gleaning Spatial justice





Author: Ailsa Beischer - Jon Corbett -

Source: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/



DOWNLOAD PDF




Related documents