Relationship of Smokefree Laws and Alcohol Use with Light and Intermittent Smoking and Quit Attempts among US Adults and Alcohol UsersReport as inadecuate




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Introduction

Light and intermittent smoking LITS has become increasingly common. Alcohol drinkers are more likely to smoke. We examined the association of smokefree law and bar law coverage and alcohol use with current smoking, LITS, and smoking quit attempts among US adults and alcohol drinkers.

Methods

Cross-sectional analyses among a population-based sample of US adults n = 27,731 using restricted data from 2009 National Health Interview Survey and 2009 American Nonsmokers- Rights Foundation United States Tobacco Control Database. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the relationship of smokefree law coverage and drinking frequency 1 with current smoking among all adults; 2 with 4 LITS patterns among current smokers; and 3 with smoking quit attempts among 6 smoking subgroups. Same multivariate analyses were conducted but substituted smokefree bar law coverage for smokefree law coverage to investigate the association between smokefree bar laws and the outcomes. Finally we ran the above analyses among alcohol drinkers n = 16,961 to examine the relationship of smokefree law and bar law coverage and binge drinking with the outcomes. All models controlled for demographics and average cigarette price per pack. The interactions of smokefree law and bar law coverage and drinking status was examined.

Results

Stronger smokefree law and bar law coverage was associated with lower odds of current smoking among all adults and among drinkers, and had the same effect across all drinking and binge drinking subgroups. Increased drinking frequency and binge drinking were related to higher odds of current smoking. Smokefree law and bar law coverage and drinking status were not associated with any LITS measures or smoking quit attempts.

Conclusions

Stronger smokefree laws and bar laws are associated with lower smoking rates across all drinking subgroups, which provides further support for these policies. More strict tobacco control measures might help reduce cigarette consumption and increase quit attempts.



Author: Nan Jiang, MariaElena Gonzalez, Pamela M. Ling, Stanton A. Glantz

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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