Relationships between Training Load, Salivary Cortisol Responses and Performance during Season Training in Middle and Long Distance RunnersReport as inadecuate




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Purpose

Monitoring training from a multifactorial point of view is of great importance in elite endurance athletes. This study aims to analyze the relationships between indicators of training load, hormonal status and neuromuscular performance, and to compare these values with competition performance, in elite middle and long-distance runners.

Method

Fifteen elite middle and long-distance runners 12 men, 3 women; age = 26.3±5.1 yrs were measured for training volume, training zone and session rate of perceived exertion RPE daily, countermovement jump CMJ and salivary free cortisol weekly for 39 weeks i.e., the whole season. Competition performance was also observed throughout the study, registering the season best and worst competitions.

Results

Season average salivary free cortisol concentrations correlate significantly with CMJ r = −0.777 and RPE r = 0.551. Also, weekly averages of CMJ significantly correlates with RPE r = −0.426, distance run r = −0.593, p<0.001 and training zone r = 0.437, p<0.05. Finally, it was found that the CMJ +8.5%, g = 0.65 and the RPE −17.6%, g = 0.94 measured the week before the best competition performance of the season were significantly different compared with the measurement conducted the week before the season’s worst competition performance.

Conclusions

Monitoring weekly measurements of CMJ and RPE could be recommended to control training process of such athletes in a non-invasive, field-based, systematic way.



Author: Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández , Carlos Mª Tejero-González, Juan del Campo-Vecino

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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