Interactions of Seedborne Bacterial Pathogens with Host and Non-Host Plants in Relation to Seed Infestation and Seedling TransmissionReport as inadecuate




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The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea to infest seeds of host and non-host plants watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1×106 colony forming units CFUs-flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels in case of onion. Seeds harvested from each host-non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host-non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out SGO assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% by plating, respectively and they were not significantly different P = 0.67. The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% by plating and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens P = 0.03. None of the seedlots with incompatible-null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be colonized by compatible-incompatible-null-interacting bacteria to higher populations; however, the level of colonization differed significantly depending on the type of bacterial species used.



Author: Bhabesh Dutta , Ronald Gitaitis, Samuel Smith, David Langston Jr

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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