Incongruence between the Preferred Mode of Delivery and Risk of Childbirth Complications among Antepartum Women in Mulago Hospital, UgandaReport as inadecuate




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Objective: Women’s preferences for the mode of delivery provideclues on their knowledge and perceptions of anticipated risk of childbirthcomplications. The objective was toinvestigate incongruence between preferred mode of delivery and risk ofadverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 327 women admitted to Mulagohospital. Data included socio-demographic characteristics, past medical, gynaecological and obstetrichistory, pregnancy complications, knowledge of pregnancy complications andpreferred mode of delivery. The preferred mode of delivery and knowledge ofrelated risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes were compared. Results: The meanage of participants was 24.7 years ±5.9, ranging 14 - 43 years, of whom 41.4% werenulliparous. The preferred mode of delivery was vaginal 84.1%. Incongruence preference for a mode ofdelivery that did not correspond to expected or anticipated risks occurred in88 26.9% of the women, and was associated with having secondary school orhigher level of education OR 2.49, CI 1.52 - 4.08 and history of previous vaginal delivery OR 3.82, CI 1.94 - 7.49. Conclusion: One in fourwomen had incongruence between preferred mode of delivery and risks of adversepregnancy outcomes, which called for urgent interventions to improve decision-making aboutintrapartum care.

KEYWORDS

Quality of Care, Intrapartum Care, Preference for Mode of Delivery, Decision-Making

Cite this paper

Kaye, D. , Nakimuli, A. , Kakaire, O. , Osinde, M. , Kakande, N. and Mbalinda, S. 2014 Incongruence between the Preferred Mode of Delivery and Risk of Childbirth Complications among Antepartum Women in Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4, 889-898. doi: 10.4236-ojog.2014.414125.





Author: Dan Kabonge Kaye1*, Annettee Nakimuli1, Othman Kakaire1, Michael Odongo Osinde2, Nelson Kakande3, Scovia Nalugo Mbalinda4

Source: http://www.scirp.org/



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