Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients with Respiratory Viral Co-Infection during the 2009 H1N1 Influenza PandemicReport as inadecuate




Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients with Respiratory Viral Co-Infection during the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Background

The clinical consequences of co-infection with two or more respiratory viruses are poorly understood. We sought to determine if co-infection with pandemic 2009–2010 influenza A H1N1 pH1N1 and another respiratory virus was associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Methods

A retrospective cohort study was performed of all hospitalized patients with a positive respiratory viral panel RVP for two or more viruses within 72 hours of admission at our institution from October 2009 to December 2009. We compared patients infected with one respiratory virus to those with respiratory viral co-infection.

Results

We identified 617 inpatients with a positive RVP sample with a single virus and 49 inpatients with a positive RVP sample for two viruses i.e. co-infection. Co-infected patients were significantly younger, more often had fever-chills, tachypnea, and they more often demonstrated interstitial opacities suggestive of viral pneumonia on the presenting chest radiograph OR 7.5, 95% CI 3.4–16.5. The likelihood of death, length of stay, and requirement for intensive care unit level of care were similar in both groups, but patients with any respiratory virus co-infection were more likely to experience complications, particularly treatment for a secondary bacterial pneumonia OR 6.8, 95% CI 3.3–14.2. Patients co-infected with pH1N1 and another respiratory virus were more likely to present with chest radiograph changes suggestive of a viral pneumonia, compared to mono-infection with pH1N1 OR 16.9, 95% CI 4.5–62.7. By logistic regression using mono-infection with non-PH1N1 viruses as the reference group, co-infection with pH1N1 was the strongest independent predictor of treatment for a secondary bacterial pneumonia OR 17.8, 95% CI 6.7–47.1.

Conclusion

Patients with viral co-infection, particularly with pH1N1, were more likely to have chest radiograph features compatible with a viral pneumonia and complications during their hospital course, particularly treatment for secondary bacterial pneumonia. Despite this, co-infection was not associated with ICU admission.



Author: Ignacio A. Echenique, Philip A. Chan, Kimberle C. Chapin, Sarah B. Andrea, Joseph L. Fava, Leonard A. Mermel

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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