Blood Chemistry, Acid-Base, Electrolyte, Blood Lactate Metabolism and Sleep at 3480 m in Mountain Marathon RunnersReport as inadecuate




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Altered blood chemistry, acid-base and electrolyte are suggested determinants of sleep disturbance, with frequent arousal at high altitude even in well and long-trained altitude marathon runners. In this sample of experienced altitude marathon runners with maximal aerobic power at sea level of 61.4 ± 2.7 ml-kg-1·min-1 we found that pO2 and percent of oxygen saturation %SO2 were lower at2050 mand3480 mthan at sea level; pO2 was higher after 38 - 41 hours than after 30 - 31 hours of acclimatization at3480 mP < 0.05. After ascentto3480 m%SO2 decreased P < 0.003. Com- pared to sea level values, pH increased at high altitude P < 0.05 consistent with changes in pCO2 and P < 0.05. Nocturnal %SpaO2 at a sleeping altitude of3480 mwas lower P < 0.05 than at sea level. At high altitude, the percent of wake W time and delay falling asleep DFA increased, whereas non-rapid eye movement sleep N-REM, REM sleep and total sleep time TST decreased P < 0.05. Simple regression analysis disclosed a significant correlation between the changes in TST and the percent of REM sleep and the changes in %SpaO2 recorded during sleep P < 0.05. Simple regression analysis showed a positive correlation between the changes in pO2 at higher altitude and the percent of W and of TST P < 0.05. The changes in pO2, tCO2 and HCO3- correlated negatively and significantly with the percent of REM sleep changes at high altitude P < 0.05. The TST changes at high altitude correlated positively with the changes in pO2 and pH and correlated negatively with the changes in %SO2, pCO2, tCO2, and HCO3- P < 0.05. The changes in the percent of W at high altitude correlated significantly and positively with the changes in bases excess BE at high altitude P < 0.05. The changes in the percent of REM sleep correlated significantly and positively with the changes in iCa++ and BE and negatively with the changes in buffered bases BB and BEeffective P < 0.05. The change in the percent of NREM + REM sleep at high altitude correlated significantly and positively with the changes in BE and BB concentration P < 0.05. The increase in DFA at high altitude correlated significantly and negatively with the changes in pCO2 and significantly and negatively with the changes in K+ P < 0.05. Simple regression analysis demonstrated that the changes in pH at high altitude correlated positively and significantly with the percent of W and the DFA and negatively with the percent of changes in NREM sleep, REM sleep, NREM + REM sleep P < 0.05. The decrease in the TST at high altitude correlated significantly and negatively with the changes in pCO2, tCO2, HCO3- and K+ P < 0.05. Our data demonstrate that the arterialized ear lobe techniques we used for evaluating most of the changes in blood chemistry, acid-base, electrolyte and blood lactate metabolism aresuitable for clinical and laboratory assessment and are important predictors of the quality and quantity of acclimatization and sleep at high altitude.

KEYWORDS

Clinical Investigation at High Altitude; Laboratory Investigation at High Altitude; Hematochemistry; Acid-Base Metabolism; Electrolyte Metabolism; Blood Lactate Metabolism; Hydration Status; Sleep Quality Indicators; EEG; Mountain Marathon Runners

Cite this paper

I. Gritti, C. Mauri, S. Defendi, D. Cesana, F. Consonni, A. Dolci and S. Luoni -Blood Chemistry, Acid-Base, Electrolyte, Blood Lactate Metabolism and Sleep at 3480 m in Mountain Marathon Runners,- Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2013, pp. 13-25. doi: 10.4236-jbbs.2013.31003.





Author: Ivana Gritti, Clara Mauri, Stefano Defendi, Daniele Cesana, Federica Consonni, Alberto Dolci, Sabrina Luoni

Source: http://www.scirp.org/



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