Adaptation in Sound Localization Processing Induced by Interaural Time Difference in Amplitude Envelope at High FrequenciesReport as inadecuate




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Background

When a second sound follows a long first sound, its location appears to be perceived away from the first one the localization-lateralization aftereffect. This aftereffect has often been considered to reflect an efficient neural coding of sound locations in the auditory system. To understand determinants of the localization aftereffect, the current study examined whether it is induced by an interaural temporal difference ITD in the amplitude envelope of high frequency transposed tones over 2 kHz, which is known to function as a sound localization cue.

Methodology-Principal Findings

In Experiment 1, participants were required to adjust the position of a pointer to the perceived location of test stimuli before and after adaptation. Test and adapter stimuli were amplitude modulated AM sounds presented at high frequencies and their positional differences were manipulated solely by the envelope ITD. Results showed that the adapter-s ITD systematically affected the perceived position of test sounds to the directions expected from the localization-lateralization aftereffect when the adapter was presented at ±600 µs ITD; a corresponding significant effect was not observed for a 0 µs ITD adapter. In Experiment 2, the observed adapter effect was confirmed using a forced-choice task. It was also found that adaptation to the AM sounds at high frequencies did not significantly change the perceived position of pure-tone test stimuli in the low frequency region 128 and 256 Hz.

Conclusions-Significance

The findings in the current study indicate that ITD in the envelope at high frequencies induces the localization aftereffect. This suggests that ITD in the high frequency region is involved in adaptive plasticity of auditory localization processing.



Author: Takayuki Kawashima , Takao Sato

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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