Household Possession and Use of Insecticide-Treated Mosquito Nets in Sierra Leone 6 Months after a National Mass-Distribution CampaignReport as inadecuate




Household Possession and Use of Insecticide-Treated Mosquito Nets in Sierra Leone 6 Months after a National Mass-Distribution Campaign - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Background

In November 2010, Sierra Leone distributed over three million long-lasting insecticide-treated nets LLINs with the objective of providing protection from malaria to individuals in all households in the country.

Methods

We conducted a nationally representative survey six months after the mass distribution campaign to evaluate its impact on household insecticide-treated net ITN ownership and use. We examined factors associated with household ITN possession and use with logistic regression models.

Results

The survey included 4,620 households with equal representation in each of the 14 districts. Six months after the campaign, 87.6% of households own at least one ITN, which represents an increase of 137% over the most recent estimate of 37% in 2008. Thirty-six percent of households possess at least one ITN per two household members; rural households were more likely than urban households to have ≥1∶2 ITN to household members, but there was no difference by socio-economic status or household head education. Among individuals in households possessing ≥1 ITN, 76.5% slept under an ITN the night preceding the survey. Individuals in households where the household head had heard malaria messaging, had correct knowledge of malaria transmission, and where at least one ITN was hanging, were more likely to have slept under an ITN.

Conclusions

The mass distribution campaign was effective at achieving high coverage levels across the population, notably so among rural households where the malaria burden is higher. These important gains in equitable access to malaria prevention will need to be maintained to produce long-term reductions in the malaria burden.



Author: Adam Bennett , Samuel Juana Smith, Sahr Yambasu, Amara Jambai, Wondimagegnehu Alemu, Augustin Kabano, Thomas P. Eisele

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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