Carneval Customs in the Lobor Region - Narodna umjetnost : Croatian journal of ethnology and folklore research, Vol.23 No.1 March 1986.Report as inadecuate




Carneval Customs in the Lobor Region - Narodna umjetnost : Croatian journal of ethnology and folklore research, Vol.23 No.1 March 1986. - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Narodna umjetnost : Croatian journal of ethnology and folklore research, Vol.23 No.1 March 1986. -

Lobor is a town in Hrvatsko Zagorje, fifty miles or so from Zagreb. It is the burrough seat for nine neighboring villages, some of which have almost merged with Lobor. At the turn of the century Lobor was the parish center, with jurisdiction over about fifteen villages. A monograph on the life and customs of the people of the Lobor region was written in this period by parish priest Josip Kotarski Kotarski, 1915, 1917, 1918. The author-s research of carnival and other customs in the Lobor region was conducted from 1974 to 1984, and she started with Kotarski-s article. She first. tried to establish how well known the customs that Kotarski registered are to the current population of Lobor, distinguishing between customs that are still practiced and those that people still recall. She then tried to determine possible changes from Kotarski-s day to the present

and register the current state of carneval customs, following the

changes that ensued in the course of her years of study.

There are three main groups of customs that Kotarski recorded.

The first are facts about what one should or sholudn-t do on Carnival Tuesday. These are data on customary procedures founded on certain beliefs, that are done with the intent of insuring prosperity in farming and personal lives. as well as facts on bans or actions forbidden on that day, in order to avoid undesirable consequences. Information on the food prepared for Carnival Tuesday can also be associated with this group, for the selection of these dishes is far from chance; it is part of an obligatory, or at least desirable inventory of Carnival Tuesday, and the dishers serve other purposes besides mere nutrition.

The second group of data in Kotarski-s text consists of adages

with which weather conditions and other forecasts are made, and

third group of data is on masks, costumes and the routes made

by costumed people.

Most of the information that Kotarski recorded on carneval customs is familiar to the residents of the Lobor Region, but not all of these have survived as living customs; they remain a part of living memory. The largest number of data in Kotarski-s text are on masks and routes made by costumed people, and such customs also dominate today in the carnival. In this research project several carneval customs have been registered that, according to the memory of the older generation informers, must have existed during Kotarski-s time, but he failed to mention then for example small groups of masked men who go from house to house, draw a circle on the ground with a stick, dance and express good wishes for the turnip harvest.



Author: Zorica Rajković - ; Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research

Source: http://hrcak.srce.hr/



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