Molecular Analysis of the Notch Repressor-Complex in Drosophila: Characterization of Potential Hairless Binding Sites on Suppressor of HairlessReport as inadecuate




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The Notch signalling pathway mediates cell-cell communication in a wide variety of organisms. The major components, as well as the basic mechanisms of Notch signal transduction, are remarkably well conserved amongst vertebrates and invertebrates. Notch signalling results in transcriptional activation of Notch target genes, which is mediated by an activator complex composed of the DNA binding protein CSL, the intracellular domain of the Notch receptor, and the transcriptional coactivator Mastermind. In the absence of active signalling, CSL represses transcription from Notch target genes by the recruitment of corepressors. The Notch activator complex is extremely well conserved and has been studied in great detail. However, Notch repressor complexes are far less understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CSL protein is termed Suppressor of Hairless SuH. SuH functions as a transcriptional repressor by binding Hairless, the major antagonist of Notch signalling in Drosophila, which in turn recruits two general corepressors – Groucho and C-terminal binding protein CtBP. Recently, we determined that the C-terminal domain CTD of SuH binds Hairless and identified a single site in Hairless, which is essential for contacting SuH. Here we present additional biochemical and in vivo studies aimed at mapping the residues in SuH that contact Hairless. Focusing on surface exposed residues in the CTD, we identified two sites that affect Hairless binding in biochemical assays. Mutation of these sites neither affects binding to DNA nor to Notch. Subsequently, these SuH mutants were found to function normally in cellular and in vivo assays using transgenic flies. However, these experiments rely on SuH overexpression, which does not allow for detection of quantitative or subtle differences in activity. We discuss the implications of our results.



Author: Patricia Kurth, Anette Preiss, Rhett A. Kovall, Dieter Maier

Source: http://plos.srce.hr/



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