THE INCREASING USE OF ETHANOL IN GASOLINE AND THE IMPACT ON THE USE OF GASOLINE DEPOSIT CONTROL ADDITIVESReport as inadecuate




THE INCREASING USE OF ETHANOL IN GASOLINE AND THE IMPACT ON THE USE OF GASOLINE DEPOSIT CONTROL ADDITIVES - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Fuels and lubricants : journal for tribology, lubrication, application of liquid and gaseous fuels and combustion engineering, Vol.46 No.3 June 2007. -

Abstract

The use of ethanol in gasoline is growing and this trend will continue well into the next decade. Brazil has been using ethanol for more than three decades and has a well established history of trouble-free use of this component. In the United States the Clean Air Act revisions of 1990 and the reformulated gasoline regulations called for oxygenates in reformulated gasoline. Early on in RFG, most refiners started using MTBE because it could be blended in easily at the refinery, and because it did not have the volatility problems that ethanol has. However, due to the unexpected taste and odour problems found in groundwater while using MTBE, this option has become far less popular. This means ethanol has gained acceptance as an oxygenate and blend component for gasoline.

In the United States the use of inlet valve deposit control additives is mandated and this means that when Ethanol becomes an accepted gasoline blend component the effect this has on additives must be given some priority. Similarly in most parts of the world it is common practice to use multifunctional detergent based additives in gasoline in order to allow oil companies to market differentiated quality at the forecourt.

This paper discusses studies conducted by Afton Chemical to ensure that existing gasoline additive chemistry is able to give optimum performance in gasoline containing different percentages of Ethanol. At the same time an investigation has been conducted to understand the need to develop different additive chemistries to deal with the changing gasoline quality.

gasoline-ethanol mixed engine fuel detergent-dispersant additive



Author: Dave Claydon - Eugen Marko -

Source: http://hrcak.srce.hr/



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