Influence of Tillage Practices and Crop Type on Soil CO2 EmissionsReport as inadecuate




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Department of General Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb, Svetošimunska cesta 25, Zagreb 10-000, Republic of Croatia





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Academic Editor: Vincenzo Torretta

Abstract Nonsustainable agricultural practices often lead to soil carbon loss and increased soil carbon dioxide CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. A research study was conducted on arable fields in central lowland Croatia to measure soil respiration, its seasonal variability, and its response to agricultural practices. Soil C-CO2 emissions were measured with the in situ static chamber method during corn Zea mays L. and winter wheat Triticum aestivum L. growing seasons 2012 and 2013, n = 288 in a field experiment with six different tillage treatments. During corn and winter wheat growing season, average monthly soil C-CO2 emissions ranged, respectively, from 6.2–33.6 and 22.1–36.2 kg ha−1 day−1, and were decreasing, respectively, from summer > spring > autumn and summer > autumn > spring. The same tillage treatments except for black fallow differed significantly between studied years crops regarding soil CO2 emissions. Significant differences in soil C-CO2 emissions between different tillage treatments with crop presence were recorded during corn but not during winter wheat growing season. In these studied agroecological conditions, optimal tillage treatment regarding emitted C-CO2 is plowing to 25 cm along the slope, but it should be noted that CO2 emissions involve a complex interaction of several factors; thus, focusing on one factor, i.e., tillage, may result in a lack of consistency across studies. View Full-Text

Keywords: soil respiration; tillage; winter wheat; corn; climate change; Croatia soil respiration; tillage; winter wheat; corn; climate change; Croatia





Author: Darija Bilandžija * , Željka Zgorelec and Ivica Kisić

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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