Total and Free Sugar Content of Canadian Prepackaged Foods and BeveragesReport as inadecuate


Total and Free Sugar Content of Canadian Prepackaged Foods and Beverages


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1

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2, Canada

2

Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract A number of recommendations for policy and program interventions to limit excess free sugar consumption have emerged, however there are a lack of data describing the amounts and types of sugar in foods. This study presents an assessment of sugar in Canadian prepackaged foods including: a the first systematic calculation of free sugar contents; b a comprehensive assessment of total sugar and free sugar levels; and c sweetener and free sugar ingredient use, using the University of Toronto’s Food Label Information Program FLIP database 2013 n = 15,342. Food groups with the highest proportion of foods containing free sugar ingredients also had the highest median total sugar and free sugar contents per 100 g-mL: desserts 94%, 15 g, and 12 g, sugars and sweets 91%, 50 g, and 50 g, and bakery products 83%, 16 g, and 14 g, proportion with free sugar ingredients, median total sugar and free sugar content in Canadian foods, respectively. Free sugar accounted for 64% of total sugar content. Eight of 17 food groups had ≥75% of the total sugar derived from free sugar. Free sugar contributed 20% of calories overall in prepackaged foods and beverages, with the highest at 70% in beverages. These data can be used to inform interventions aimed at limiting free sugar consumption. View Full-Text

Keywords: sugars; free sugar; nutrition labelling; food composition; food supply; Canada; public health; policy sugars; free sugar; nutrition labelling; food composition; food supply; Canada; public health; policy





Author: Jodi T. Bernstein 1, Alyssa Schermel 1, Christine M. Mills 2 and Mary R. L’Abbé 1,*

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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