Metabolic Syndrome and Framingham Risk Score: Observation from Screening of Low-Income Semi-Urban African WomenReport as inadecuate




Metabolic Syndrome and Framingham Risk Score: Observation from Screening of Low-Income Semi-Urban African Women - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

1

Department of Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria

2

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria

3

Department of Surgery, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria

4

Department of Community Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti 36001, Ekiti State, Nigeria





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editor: Ryuichi Morishita

Abstract Background: The heightened cardiovascular risk associated with metabolic syndrome MetS has been documented by several researchers. The Framingham risk score FRS provides a simple and efficient method for identifying individuals at cardiovascular risk. The objective was to describe the prevalence of MetS and its association with FRS in predicting cardiovascular disease among a cohort of semi-urban women; Method: Clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated among 189 healthy women. The International Diabetes Federation definition was used to diagnose metabolic syndrome. FRS was calculated for each participant; Result: About two thirds of the participant make less than $US 90 per month. The mean systolic blood pressure was 131.80 ± 30. Eighty 42.3% participants were overweight with a mean waist circumference of 91.64 ± 11.19 cm. MetS was present in 46 24.3%. Individuals with MetS were more likely to have increased FRS, p = 0.012. One hundred and eighty seven 98.9% were in the low risk category according to FRS. There was a significant difference in the mean FRS between participants with and without MetS 13.52 versus 10.29 p = 0.025; Conclusion: Prevalence of MetS in this study was comparable to the global rate, despite a low economic status. Individuals with MetS were more likely to have cardiovascular disease than persons without MetS, thus emphasizing the need for risk stratification and prompt management. View Full-Text

Keywords: metabolic syndrome; Framingham risk score; cardiovascular disease metabolic syndrome; Framingham risk score; cardiovascular disease





Author: Ayokunle S. Dada 1,* , Daisi D. Ajayi 2, Peter O. Areo 3, Taiwo H. Raimi 1, Eyitayo E. Emmanuel 4, Olusola O. Odu 4 and Olusegun A. Aremu 1

Source: http://mdpi.com/



DOWNLOAD PDF




Related documents