Genetic Testing in the Diagnosis of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia: State-of-the-Art and Future PerspectivesReport as inadecuate




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1

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK

2

NIHR Southampton Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK

3

Clinical and Experimental Sciences Academic Unit Mail Point 803, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract Primary ciliary dyskinesia PCD is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive condition affecting around 1:15,000. In people with PCD, microscopic motile cilia do not move normally resulting in impaired clearance of mucus and debris leading to repeated sinopulmonary infection. If diagnosis is delayed, permanent bronchiectasis and deterioration of lung function occurs. Other complications associated with PCD include congenital heart disease, hearing impairment and infertility. A small number of longitudinal studies suggest that lung function deteriorates before diagnosis of PCD but may stabilise following diagnosis with subsequent specialist management. Early diagnosis is therefore essential, but for a number of reasons referral for diagnostic testing is often delayed until older childhood or even adulthood. Functional diagnostic tests for PCD are expensive, time consuming and require specialist equipment and scientists. In the last few years, there have been considerable developments to identify genes associated with PCD, currently enabling 65% of patients to be identified by bi-allelic mutations. The rapid identification of new genes continues. This review will consider the evidence that early diagnosis of PCD is beneficial. It will review the recent advances in identification of PCD-associated genes and will discuss the role of genetic testing in PCD. It will then consider whether screening for PCD antenatally or in the new born is likely to become a feasible and acceptable for this rare disease. View Full-Text

Keywords: primary ciliary dyskinesia; cystic fibrosis; genetic testing; screening; mutation; cilia; diagnosis primary ciliary dyskinesia; cystic fibrosis; genetic testing; screening; mutation; cilia; diagnosis





Author: Samuel A. Collins 1,2,3, Woolf T. Walker 1,2,3 and Jane S. Lucas 1,2,3,*

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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