Prevalence of Self-Reported Shaking and Smothering and Their Associations with Co-Sleeping among 4-Month-Old Infants in JapanReport as inadecuate




Prevalence of Self-Reported Shaking and Smothering and Their Associations with Co-Sleeping among 4-Month-Old Infants in Japan - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

1

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan

2

Department of Developmental Social Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan





*

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract Few studies have investigated the prevalence of shaking and smothering and whether they are associated with co-sleeping. In Japan, co-sleeping is common during infancy and early childhood. This study investigates the prevalence of shaking and smothering and their associations with co-sleeping among 4-month-old infants in Japan. A questionnaire was administered to mothers who participated in a 4-month health checkup program in Kamagaya City in Japan n = 1307; valid response rate, 82%. The questionnaire investigated the frequency of self-reported shaking and smothering during the past one month, co-sleeping status, and living arrangements with grandparents, in addition to traditional risk factors such as stress due to crying. Associations between co-sleeping and self-reported shaking or smothering were analyzed using multiple logistic regression. The prevalence of self-reported shaking and smothering at least one time during the past one month was 3.4% 95% confidence interval CI, 2.4%–4.3% and 2.4% 95% CI, 1.5%–3.2%, respectively. Co-sleeping was marginally associated with the amount of crying and not associated with stress due to crying. Further, co-sleeping was not associated with either self-reported shaking or smothering, although stress due to crying showed strong association with shaking and smothering. Co-sleeping was not a risk factor for shaking and smothering. View Full-Text

Keywords: abusive head trauma; shaken baby syndrome; shaking; smothering; child abuse; co-sleeping; crying; Japan abusive head trauma; shaken baby syndrome; shaking; smothering; child abuse; co-sleeping; crying; Japan





Author: Fujiko Yamada 1,2 and Takeo Fujiwara 1,2,*

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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