Evaluation of Potential Average Daily Doses ADDs of PM2.5 for Homemakers Conducting Pan-Frying Inside Ordinary Homes under Four Ventilation ConditionsReport as inadecuate


Evaluation of Potential Average Daily Doses ADDs of PM2.5 for Homemakers Conducting Pan-Frying Inside Ordinary Homes under Four Ventilation Conditions


Evaluation of Potential Average Daily Doses ADDs of PM2.5 for Homemakers Conducting Pan-Frying Inside Ordinary Homes under Four Ventilation Conditions - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan 31538, Korea





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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou

Abstract Several studies reported that commercial barbecue restaurants likely contribute to the indoor emission of particulate matters with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less PM2.5 while pan-frying meat. However, there is inadequate knowledge of exposure level to indoor PM2.5 in homes and the contribution of a typical indoor pan-frying event. We measured the indoor PM2.5 concentration and, using Monte-Carlo simulation, estimated potential average daily dose ADD of PM2.5 for homemakers pan-frying a piece of pork inside ordinary homes. Convenience-based sampling at 13 homes was conducted over four consecutive days in June 2013 n = 52. Although we pan-fried 100 g pork for only 9 min, the median interquartile range, IQR value was 4.5 2.2–5.6 mg-m3 for no ventilation and 0.5 0.1–1.3 mg-m3 with an active stove hood ventilation system over a 2 h sampling interval. The probabilities that the ADDs from inhalation of indoor PM2.5 would be higher than the ADD from inhalation of PM2.5 on an outdoor roadside 4.6 μg-kg·day were 99.44%, 97.51%, 93.64%, and 67.23%, depending on the ventilation conditions: 1 no window open; 2 one window open in the kitchen; 3 two windows open, one each in the kitchen and living room; and 4 operating a forced-air stove hood, respectively. View Full-Text

Keywords: PM2.5; average daily doses; indoor; ventilation; pan-frying PM2.5; average daily doses; indoor; ventilation; pan-frying





Author: Seonyeop Lee, Sol Yu and Sungroul Kim *

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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