Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar Cryptomeria japonica Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous WorkReport as inadecuate


Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar Cryptomeria japonica Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work


Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar Cryptomeria japonica Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, 1 Matsunosato, Tsukuba 305-8687, Japan





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Academic Editor: William A. Toscano

Abstract Employee problems arising from mental illnesses have steadily increased and become a serious social problem in recent years. Wood is a widely available plant material, and knowledge of the psychophysiological effects of inhalation of woody volatile compounds has grown considerably. In this study, we established an experimental method to evaluate the effects of Japanese cedar wood essential oil on subjects performing monotonous work. Two experiment conditions, one with and another without diffusion of the essential oil were prepared. Salivary stress markers were determined during and after a calculation task followed by distribution of questionnaires to achieve subjective odor assessment. We found that inhalation of air containing the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil increased the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate DHEA-s. Slight differences in the subjective assessment of the odor of the experiment rooms were observed. The results of the present study indicate that the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil affect the endocrine regulatory mechanism to facilitate stress responses. Thus, we suggest that this essential oil can improve employees’ mental health. View Full-Text

Keywords: Cryptomeria japonica; wood; essential oil; salivary biomarkers; DHEA-s Cryptomeria japonica; wood; essential oil; salivary biomarkers; DHEA-s





Author: Eri Matsubara * , Yuko Tsunetsugu, Tatsuro Ohira and Masaki Sugiyama

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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