Black–White and Country of Birth Disparities in Retention in HIV Care and Viral Suppression among Latinos with HIV in Florida, 2015Report as inadecuate




Black–White and Country of Birth Disparities in Retention in HIV Care and Viral Suppression among Latinos with HIV in Florida, 2015 - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

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Department of Epidemiology, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33199, USA

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Center for Substance Use and HIV-AIDS Research on Latinos in the United States C–SALUD, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33199, USA

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HIV-AIDS Section, Florida Department of Health, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399, USA

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Florida Consortium for HIV-AIDS Research-The AIDS Institute, 410 Victory Garden Dr., Suite 127, Tallahassee, FL 32301, USA

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Department of Epidemiology and Center for Substance Use and HIV-AIDS Research on Latinos in the United States C–SALUD, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33199, USA





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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Academic Editors: Ronald L. Braithwaite and Selina A. Smith

Abstract The study’s purpose was to identify HIV, Black–White race, and birth country disparities in retention in HIV care and HIV viral load VL suppression among Latinos, in 2015. Florida’s surveillance data for Latinos diagnosed with HIV 2000–2014 were merged with American Community Survey data. Multi-level random effects models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios aOR for non-retention in care and non-viral load suppression. Blacks and Whites experienced similar odds of non–retention in care. Racial differences in VL suppression disappeared after controlling for neighborhood factors. Compared to U.S.–born Latinos, those born in Mexico retention aOR 2.00, 95% CI 1.70–2.36; VL 1.85, 95% CI 1.57–2.17 and Central America retention aOR 1.33, 95% CI 1.16–1.53; VL 1.28, 95% CI 1.12–2.47 were at an increased risk after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors. Among Central Americans, those born in Guatemala retention aOR 2.39, 95% CI 1.80–3.18; VL 2.20, 95% CI 1.66–2.92 and Honduras retention aOR 1.39, 95% CI 1.13–1.72; VL 1.42, 95% CI 1.16–1.74 experienced the largest disparities, when compared to U.S.-born Latinos. Disparities in care and treatment exist within the Latino population. Cultural and other factors, unique to Latino Black-White racial and birth country subgroups, should be further studied and considered for intervention. View Full-Text

Keywords: Latinos; racial disparities; birth country disparities; human immunodeficiency virus; retention in HIV care; viral suppression Latinos; racial disparities; birth country disparities; human immunodeficiency virus; retention in HIV care; viral suppression





Author: Diana M. Sheehan 1,* , Daniel E. Mauck 1, Kristopher P. Fennie 1, Elena A. Cyrus 2, Lorene M. Maddox 3, Spencer Lieb 4 and Mary Jo Trepka 5

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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