Does a Change from Whole to Powdered Food Artemia franciscana eggs Increase Oviposition in the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculataReport as inadecuate




Does a Change from Whole to Powdered Food Artemia franciscana eggs Increase Oviposition in the Ladybird Coleomegilla maculata - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

National Biological Control Laboratory, Jamie Whitten Delta States Research Center, ARS-USDA, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA



These authors contributed equally to this work.





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Academic Editor: Brian T. Forschler

Abstract The limited availability of alternative foods to replace natural prey hinders cost-effective mass production of ladybird beetles for augmentative biological control. We compared the effects of powdered vs. whole Artemia franciscana A. franciscana brine shrimp eggs with or without a dietary supplement on development and reproduction of Coleomegilla maculata C. maculata Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. We tested the hypotheses that 1 powdered A. franciscana eggs are more suitable than whole eggs; and 2 palmitic acid, a common fatty acid in natural prey, i.e., aphids, is an effective dietary supplement. Development time, pre-imaginal survival, sex ratio, and body weight of adults did not differ significantly amongst individuals fed powdered vs. whole eggs, with or without 5% palmitic acid. Significantly more oviposition occurred when females were fed powdered eggs than whole eggs and powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid than whole eggs with or without 5% palmitic acid. A weak functional relationship was found between pre-oviposition time and total oviposition by females fed powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid; pre-oviposition time decreased as oviposition increased. Food treatments had no significant differential effect on progeny egg hatch rate. In conclusion, a simple change in A. franciscana egg texture and particle size i.e., blending whole eggs into a dust-like powder increases oviposition in C. maculata. Supplementing powdered eggs with 5% palmitic acid might accelerate oogenesis egg maturation in some females. View Full-Text

Keywords: Artemiidae; Coccinellidae; biological control; lady beetle; lipids; predator Artemiidae; Coccinellidae; biological control; lady beetle; lipids; predator





Author: Eric W. Riddick †,* and Zhixin Wu †

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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