Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis SalinaReport as inadecuate


Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina


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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 1529 W Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim, WA 98382, USA





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Abstract Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the environment, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity 5–850 μmol m−2 s−1 and temperature 13–40 °C and its exponential growth rate, total fatty acids TFA and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day−1 at 23 °C and 250 μmol m−2 s−1. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection GC-FID after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters FAMEs. A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid C16:0 and palmitoleic acid C16:1 during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoic acids C20:5ω3. As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid C18:1ω9. The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. These data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production. View Full-Text

Keywords: algae; biofuels; climate; fatty acid; Nannochloropsis salina algae; biofuels; climate; fatty acid; Nannochloropsis salina





Author: Jon Van Wagenen, Tyler W. Miller, Sam Hobbs, Paul Hook, Braden Crowe and Michael Huesemann *

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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