Undergraduate Confidence When Undertaking Root Canal Treatment and Their Perception of the Quality of Their Endodontic EducationReport as inadecuate




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School of Oral and Dental Sciences, Bristol Dental Hospital, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK





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Academic Editor: Claude Jaquiéry

Abstract The General Dental Council expects graduating dentists to be competent at treating pulpal disease. Previous studies have found dental undergraduates to have low levels of confidence with respect to endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the confidence of undergraduate dental students at the University of Bristol when performing root canal treatment, and to investigate their perception of the quality of their endodontic education. An anonymous questionnaire, based upon one used in a 2015 study at Cardiff University, was distributed to all n = 204 undergraduate students in Years 3–5 at the University of Bristol. The results were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software SPSS. There was a 59% n = 120 response rate and a significant p < 0.01 difference in confidence levels for root canal treatments RCTs completed between these students. All 100% Year-5 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 91% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. The majority 93% of Year-4 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 77% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. Over one-half 56% of Year-3 students felt confident in anterior RCTs and 17% in posterior RCTs. With respect to the individual stages of RCT access cavity, cleaning and shaping of root canal system, and obturation-filling, results showed that there was a significant difference p < 0.01 in confidence levels between year groups. Many students thought the amount of time spent on endodontic teaching and the quality of teaching to be satisfactory. Improvements suggested for future endodontic teaching included higher numbers of staff supervision and additional endodontic practice on extracted teeth before seeing patients. There was a strong association between students’ clinical experience and their levels of confidence when completing RCT. Increasing the amount of clinical experience of RCTs could enhance students’ confidence further. View Full-Text

Keywords: undergraduate; endodontics; confidence; teaching undergraduate; endodontics; confidence; teaching





Author: James Puryer * , Salisha Amin and Maxwell Turner

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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