Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Associated with Worm Control in LambsReport as inadecuate




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Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Penicuik, EH26 0PZ, Scotland, UK

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SEE360, Bush House, Edinburgh Technopole, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0BB Scotland, UK





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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.



Abstract There are currently little or no data on the role of endemic disease control in reducing greenhouse gas GHG emissions from livestock. In the present study, we have used an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC-compliant model to calculate GHG emissions from naturally grazing lambs under four different anthelmintic drug treatment regimes over a 5-year study period. Treatments were either -monthly- NST -strategic- SPT -targeted- TST or based on -clinical signs- MT. Commercial sheep farming practices were simulated, with lambs reaching a pre-selected target market weight 38 kg removed from the analysis as they would no longer contribute to the GHG budget of the flock. Results showed there was a significant treatment effect over all years, with lambs in the MT group consistently taking longer to reach market weight, and an extra 10% emission of CO2e per kg of weight gain over the other treatments. There were no significant differences between the other three treatment strategies NST, SPT and TST in terms of production efficiency or cumulated GHG emissions over the experimental period. This study has shown that endemic disease control can contribute to a reduction in GHG emissions from animal agriculture and help reduce the carbon footprint of livestock farming. View Full-Text

Keywords: greenhouse gas emissions; sustainable parasite control; targeted selective treatment; carbon footprint; livestock; anthelmintic greenhouse gas emissions; sustainable parasite control; targeted selective treatment; carbon footprint; livestock; anthelmintic





Author: Fiona Kenyon 1, Jan M. Dick 2, Ron I. Smith 2, Drew G. Coulter 2, David McBean 1 and Philip J. Skuce 1,*

Source: http://mdpi.com/



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