Vol 6: Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Detects Meckels Diverticulum in a Child with Unexplained Intestinal Blood Loss.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 6: Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Detects Meckels Diverticulum in a Child with Unexplained Intestinal Blood Loss.


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This article is from Case Reports in Gastroenterology, volume 6.AbstractMeckels diverticulum MD is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal GI tract, affecting about 2% of the population. Most cases of Meckels diverticula are asymptomatic. The diagnosis of symptomatic MD is often difficult to make. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with GI bleeding due to MD. The diagnostic difficulties after an initial negative endoscopic evaluation and the diagnostic value of the various endoscopic procedures are discussed. The patient had suffered from bright red stools for 20 h before hospital admission. GI scintigraphy with 99mTc-Na-pertechnetate was negative for heterotopic gastric tissue in the small bowel area. Colonoscopy performed in order to exclude Crohns disease was also negative. He was placed on ranitidine at a dose of 6 mg-kg body weight twice daily. The patient remained asymptomatic over a period of 6 months before he was readmitted due to macroscopic rectal bleeding. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy used to investigate the source of bleeding showed normal macroscopic findings. Radiolabeling of blood constituents with 99mTc on delayed imaging showed radionucleotide concentration in the ascending and transverse colon suggestive of a lesion in the ileocecal area. Further investigation with the use of wireless capsule endoscopy revealed a MD. Wireless capsule endoscopy may thus be indicated for patients with GI blood loss when other diagnostic methods, such as upper and lower endoscopy and colonoscopy, have failed to identify the source of bleeding.



Author: Xinias, I.; Mavroudi, A.; Fotoulaki, M.; Tsikopoulos, G.; Kalampakas, A.; Imvrios, G.

Source: https://archive.org/



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