Vol 9: Validation of doubled haploid plants by enzymatic mismatch cleavage.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 9: Validation of doubled haploid plants by enzymatic mismatch cleavage.


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This article is from Plant Methods, volume 9.AbstractBackground: Doubled haploidy is a fundamental tool in plant breeding as it provides the fastest way to generate populations of meiotic recombinants in a genetically fixed state. A wide range of methods has been developed to produce doubled haploid DH plants and recent advances promise efficient DH production in otherwise recalcitrant species. Since the cellular origin of the plants produced is not always certain, rapid screening techniques are needed to validate that the produced individuals are indeed homozygous and genetically distinct from each other. Ideal methods are easily implemented across species and in crops where whole genome sequence and marker resources are limited. Results: We have adapted enzymatic mismatch cleavage techniques commonly used for TILLING Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes for the evaluation of heterozygosity in parental, F1 and putative DH plants. We used barley as a model crop and tested 26 amplicons previously developed for TILLING. Experiments were performed using self-extracted single-strand-specific nuclease and standard native agarose gels. Eleven of the twenty-six tested primers allowed unambiguous assignment of heterozygosity in material from F1 crosses and loss of heterozygosity in the DH plants. Through parallel testing of previously developed Simple Sequence Repeat SSR markers, we show that 3-32 SSR markers were suitable for screening. This suggests that enzymatic mismatch cleavage approaches can be more efficient than SSR based screening, even in species with well-developed markers. Conclusions: Enzymatic mismatch cleavage has been applied for mutation discovery in many plant species, including those with little or no available genomic DNA sequence information. Here, we show that the same methods provide an efficient system to screen for the production of DH material without the need of specialized equipment. This gene target based approach further allows discovery of novel nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes in the parental lines.



Author: Hofinger, Bernhard J; Huynh, Owen A; Jankowicz-Cieslak, Joanna; Muller, Andrea; Otto, Ingrid; Kumlehn, Jochen; Till, Bradley J

Source: https://archive.org/







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