Vol 9: The Adaptive Significance of Enamel Loss in the Mandibular Incisors of Cercopithecine Primates Mammalia: Cercopithecidae: A Finite Element Modelling Study.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 9: The Adaptive Significance of Enamel Loss in the Mandibular Incisors of Cercopithecine Primates Mammalia: Cercopithecidae: A Finite Element Modelling Study.


Vol 9: The Adaptive Significance of Enamel Loss in the Mandibular Incisors of Cercopithecine Primates Mammalia: Cercopithecidae: A Finite Element Modelling Study. - Download this document for free, or read online. Document in PDF available to download.

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This article is from PLoS ONE, volume 9.AbstractIn several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual tongue side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion peeling, scraping of tough-skinned fruits.



Author: Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

Source: https://archive.org/







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