Vol 9: Sedation Agents Differentially Modulate Cortical and Subcortical Blood Oxygenation: Evidence from Ultra-High Field MRI at 17.2 T.Report as inadecuate



 Vol 9: Sedation Agents Differentially Modulate Cortical and Subcortical Blood Oxygenation: Evidence from Ultra-High Field MRI at 17.2 T.


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This article is from PLoS ONE, volume 9.AbstractBackground: Sedation agents affect brain hemodynamic and metabolism leading to specific modifications of the cerebral blood oxygenation level. We previously demonstrated that ultra-high field UHF MRI detects changes in cortical blood oxygenation following the administration of sedation drugs commonly used in animal research. Here we applied the UHF-MRI method to study clinically relevant sedation drugs for their effects on cortical and subcortical thalamus, striatum oxygenation levels. Methods: We acquired T2*-weighted images of Sprague-Dawley rat brains at 17.2T in vivo. During each MRI session, rats were first anesthetized with isoflurane, then with a second sedative agent sevoflurane, propofol, midazolam, medetomidine or ketamine-xylazine after stopping isoflurane. We computed a T2*-oxygenation-ratio that aimed at estimating cerebral blood oxygenation level for each sedative agent in each region of interest: cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and striatum. Results: The T2*-oxygenation-ratio was consistent across scan sessions. This ratio was higher with inhalational agents than with intravenous agents. Under sevoflurane and medetomidine, T2*-oxygenation-ratio was homogenous across the brain regions. Intravenous agents except medetomidine induced a T2*-oxygenation-ratio imbalance between cortex and subcortical regions: T2*-oxygenation-ratio was higher in the cortex than the subcortical areas under ketamine-xylazine; T2*-oxygenation-ratio was higher in subcortical regions than in the cortex under propofol or midazolam. Conclusion: Preclinical UHF MRI is a powerful method to monitor the changes in cerebral blood oxygenation level induced by sedative agents across brain structures. This approach also allows for a classification of sedative agents based on their differential effects on cerebral blood oxygenation level.



Author: Uhrig, Lynn; Ciobanu, Luisa; Djemai, Boucif; Le Bihan, Denis; Jarraya, Bechir

Source: https://archive.org/







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